How to Lower Motorcycle Insurance

Know Your Bike

1.

Check your motorcycle's engine size. The larger the displacement, the higher you'll pay.

2.

Make sure the insurance company classifies your bike correctly. Sport bikes are more expensive to insure than standards, so make sure the insurance company is not categorizing your standard as a sport bike.

3.

Look for a used bike. Insurance companies take the motorcycle's year into account. The newer the motorcycle, the more you'll pay.

Ride and Research Responsibly

1.

Participate in an MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) course. The more credible experience you have on the road, the cheaper your premium will be, thanks to safety course discounts. Insurance companies want to know that their clients are make a valiant effort to stay safe on the street and will reward in return.

2.

Refrain from speeding, wheelies and other forms of hooliganism on the road that could lead to an accident or jail time. Make sure to keep a clean riding and driving record and save the shenanigans for the track or the Dragon's Tail.

3.

Ask about discounts, such as safety course certificates, membership to a motorcycle organization, or if you own more than one motorcycle.

4.

Shop around for quotes. Do not settle on an insurance company until you have found the cheapest premium with the most impressive coverage.

Tips and Warnings

  • Most insurance companies base a large portion of your premium on the bike's engine size. A bike like the Hayabusa has a 1300cc engine, which is one of the largest displacements on a sport bike, next to the 1400cc ZX14. Consequently, both bikes will cost you a significant chunk of change to cover. If you're stuck between a 1050cc Speed Triple and Monster 800, remember that the lower the CCs, the lower the cost.
  • Make sure the insurance company places your bike within the proper classification. For instance, the Kawasaki ZRX 1200R is a "Naked" or "Standard" bike, but most insurance companies will classify it as a sport bike. There are price differences depending on what classification your bike falls under. Sportbikes tend to be more pricey, thanks to their aggressive riding applications. Cruisers or touring bikes will assuage the wallet, due to their more subdued riding styles.
  • Don't be afraid to purchase a used bike. Insurance companies also take the bike's year into account. The older the motorcycle, the cheaper the premium. There are plenty of impeccably kept motorcycles out there on sites like Craigslist that just need a new owner.
  • It pays to be old. Mature riders often get a discount, since they've been on the road longer than most other riders. An 18-year old with a brand new ZX10 and an undeniable need for speed is like chum for an insurance company. Get some miles and years under your belt and you will be financially rewarded in the long run.
  • Geico offers a 20 percent discount of you're an MSF instructor or insure more than one motorcycle with them. Allstate will give a discount for belonging to a motorcycle organization, such as the ZRXOA. Progressive awards discounts to riders with no accidents or violations for a year. Most homeowners and married riders also pay less for insurance.
  • You'd be shocked at how much policy premiums vary from company to company. Provide all the ammunition you have with safety certificates and other discount-worthy facts and don't be afraid to keep on trucking until you have found the best company.
  • Always ride responsibly.
  • There's nothing like taking that first ride out of the dealership on your brand new Busa. But having to deal with an insurance policy that costs more than a brand new Mustang takes all the fun out of blasting down the highway at 180. There are ways to lower your insurance on a motorcycle, so take heed.